How the Coronavirus is affecting weddings. 1

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve likely heard about the current public health crisis pandemic called the Coronavirus (COVID-19). You’ve probably heard that there are preventative measures you can take to protect your health as well as advisories around traveling, however, the effects of this outbreak may disrupt many aspects of our daily lives.

This includes wedding planning. If you’re currently engaged and getting married this year, you may want to consider how these disturbances could affect your big day. Below we’ve outlined a few things you should keep in mind or look out for in terms of the ways the coronavirus could impact your wedding day.

If you’re getting married this year in 2020

If your wedding is within the next 1-2 months, there is a large possibility that your plans could be majorly impacted. Now that the virus is spreading, you will want to take proper precautions to ensure the safety of yourselves and your guests. This might include making the hard decision to postpone. Obviously this is a heartbreaking decision to have to make, and one we totally empathize with.

 

What is your worst-case scenario? Do you want to get married no matter what?

You can always go ahead with a small ceremony with only immediate family. Cut the cake and have a reception with family and friends at another time.

FAQs About the Coronavirus and Weddings

The biggest questions we’ve received have been pretty much the same. In essence, what should we do about our wedding in light of Coronavirus concerns?

What happens if I need to reschedule or postpone my wedding?

Most venues and vendors are being flexible with couples by allowing them to postpone or reschedule without penalty. They aren’t necessarily obligated or required to, so be gracious with them if they are accommodating to you. Under the circumstances, they want to do right by their couples and their businesses.

Will my wedding insurance cover postponing my wedding?

If you have a pre-existing insurance policy that you purchased prior to the news of COVID-19, you might be eligible for claims. You will need to check the details of your policies. Most event insurance policies will only cover if you are forced to cancel or postpone your wedding (ie because the venue closes or you or immediate family are ill.) If your venue is the one to make the call to close down or cancel, then you should be covered. If the government puts a true ban on public events in place, you would likely be covered. Only policies purchased in advance of the knowledge of any serious potential issue would be honored, so purchasing a policy now would not cover you.


Should I cancel my wedding or honeymoon because of Coronavirus?

It depends. According to Honeyfund CEO Sara Margulis, her advice is to keep the wedding, reschedule the honeymoon.

In essence, you should make the choice that feels right to you. If your guests are mostly local, you may not have as much of a cause for concern. As some guests may be unable to make it, you could potentially downsize some of the packages you purchased for your wedding to reduce some of your costs.

If a large portion of your guest list is unable to make it, consider having more of an elopement or micro wedding ceremony on your original date and throw a party or reception at a later time.